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Tuesday, 2 February 2016

Turkish MIT is behind abduction and execution of Syrian archbishops

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It is an open secret that Turkish President R. Erdogan wishes to revive the Ottoman Empire, but he wants to establish it on the ideas of radical Islam.

Erdogan follows ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood, namely the superiority of Muslims over others. The idea of Islamism has become one of the main reasons why Turkey supports radical Islamist groups in Syria. Therefore, Erdogan also aims to destroy the leaders of the Christian minority living in the areas bordering with Turkey to expand his influence in the region.

Syrian orthodox archbishops of Aleppo, Boulos Yazigi and Yohanna Ibrahim, were kidnapped in April 2013 in suburbs of Aleppo, Northern Syria. As it has appeared, Turkish NationalIntelligence Agency (MIT), acting on the instructions of Erdogan, is behind the kidnapping of Syrian Metropolitans,seized in Aleppo.

Arabic news channel Al-Alam reported that abducted Syrian Metropolitans had been held by terrorists in the territory of the Turkish Republic.Turkish authorities have done nothing to free the archbishops. It seems thatthe President of Turkey commanded not to interfere.
However, not everything went as planned. In July 2013, a Dagestani named Magomed Abdurakhmanov, or Abu Banat, a leader of terrorist group Katibat al-Muhajireen, fighting in Syria against Bashar al-Assad, was arrested in Turkey for illegal possession of weapons. It turned out that he came to Turkey for medical treatment after being wounded.During the investigation, Abu Banat claimed that he cooperated closely with the MIT and, in particular, he performed a special task to seize and kill the Syrian Metropolitans in Aleppo.

Abu Banat also said that to kidnap archbishops he received radio transceiver and tracking devices from a certain MIT officer named Abu-Jahfer. It is clear that the equipment was necessary for the MIT to monitor and coordinate the operation.

Abu Banat attracted the attention of the Turkish police after one of the officers identified him in the video of wanton murder of Francois Murad accused by Katibat al-Muhajireenin collaboration with the Bashar al-Assad’s army. The video has caused a wide resonance and got leaked to the mass media.

Despite Abu Banat’s evidence of cooperation with the Turkish secret service in the kidnapping of the Syrian priests, the information is still kept in the dark. Turkish officials tried to hush up the case, as it relates to the personal interests of Turkish President.

However, as early as September 2013, a young Turkish lawyer, Erkan Metin revealed the truth in his investigation. But a criminal case on the fact of mass murder against Abu Banat wasn’t opened. Abdurakhmanov admitted that he was involved in the beheading of more than 70 people, mostly members of the clergy, non-Wahhabis.Abu Banat was justified by the fact that the case relates to the internal Syrian conflict.

Lawyer Erol Dora, a member of the Turkish Parliament,said that Abu Banat should be judged to the maximum extent possible under the Turkish law. However, the law of the Ottoman state is under control of Erdogan’s interests instead of a fair trial.

As a result,Abu Banat was sentenced to 7.5 years in prison on charges of illegal possession of weapons and involvement in a terrorist groupon July 15, 2015.

Apparently, the reason for such a lenient sentence against terrorists is the fact that he was acting on instructions from the Turkish Intelligence Service, which in turn executes Erdogan’s orders. It is obvious that the MIT will prevent disclosure of information about cooperation with terrorist groups in Syria.

In my opinion, it is time for Turkish people to think what else Erdogan could do in future, if now he cooperates with terrorists in Syria and orders to kill Christian priests.
Mideast Russia's photo.
Mideast Russia's photo.

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